Dear Mr. President,

Dear Mr. President,

You having a chance to become the first African-American president of the United States has set a great example for many troubled, young African-American men like myself.

The Night My Sister Saved Me

OK, this is a hard one for me to write for a number of reasons, chief among them being the fact that I must hold myself accountable, as well as be held by all who will read this.

I See My Life Passing, and I’ve Learned

I grew up in the rough part of San Jose; the east side. I ran with the local crew and began to participate in gang activity. My first encounter with the law was at the age of 13.

What Does It Mean to Be a Real Man?

One can be successful without having to hit rock bottom. It is very easy to go to prison but very difficult to come out.

The Little Boy Who Lost His Dream

As I grew older, the innocence I had as a child was lost. That was when my neighborhood became heavily infested with drug dealers and violent gang members. Living in the neighborhood became an everyday struggle just to survive.

You Can Control the Mind That Is Now Your Worst Enemy

To the amazing young men and women incarcerated across the United States of America — my question to you is this. Take a long, hard look at where you at. Ask yourself — do you like where you are right now?

What Do You Want to Be?

Warning: What you are about to hear I wish on no one. That is why I am writing you this letter.

In for Life, After a Life of Abuse

The violence I was exposed to at an early age shaped who I became. It desensitized my perspective on violence, numbed my cries and dumbed down violence to the point I stopped asking why.