gang database: Seated man at microphone props up chin looking right.

New York City Bill That Would Tweak Gang Database Gets Heated Hearing

In the early morning hours of April 27, 2016, Kraig Lewis was up late studying for his statistics final. A graduate student at the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut with only nine credits left until completing his MBA, Lewis planned to go to law school next. At about 4 a.m., Bridgeport Police banged on his door. 

Atlanta Expert Says ‘Great Gun Divide’ Can Suffocate Safety Lessons

Guns are everywhere you think they’re not. Guns have been found on the floor of a movie theater and in the diaper aisle of a big box retailer. They aren’t just slid under a mattress at home or tossed up to the top shelf of a closet; they’re lying in a pile of leaves, or behind a toilet in an airport.

Gun Violence in South Outpaces Other Regions For Many Reasons

The mother left and two teens were alone in the house. It took the 13-year-old son 10 minutes to find the gun. It was loaded and in a bottom dresser drawer covered by one piece of clothing. It might as well have been on the fireplace mantle.

host home: Smiling woman with red hair held back by black hairband stands at door.

Washington State Tries Host Homes, Permanency Navigators for Homeless Teens

Nataya Foss remembers being told that she would soon have to leave the shelter. She had been staying in one of Washington state’s few shelters for unaccompanied homeless minors, but because of restrictions that come with government funding, the shelter could house her for only three weeks. Her time was almost up.

Broward County: Cityscape with tall white building in center.

Florida Progressive Candidates Could Mean Big Changes in Broward County

On June 4, after 44 years in office, Broward County’s state attorney, Michael Satz, announced he’ll be stepping down. His departure could herald a sea change for the county’s criminal justice system, which has been marred by high-profile crimes and allegations of racially biased policing.

Smiling Sarah Bryer with dark hair and sunshine in the background.

Activists Must Take ‘Macro’ Approach, Address Fundamental Inequalities, NJJN’s Bryer Says

Sarah Bryer is planning to step down from her position as executive director of the National Juvenile Justice Network when her successor is chosen. The organization, which she led since its founding in 2005, works for a fairer juvenile justice system through a network of state-based reform organizations and with the alumni of its Youth Justice Leadership Institute. Here, Bryer talks with reporter Stell Simonton about the changes she’s seen and the continued challenges.

Partially gloved mittens holding a cardboard cutout of a house, with fuzzy background.

Youth Show Ways to Reshape Homeless Policy, Chapin Hall Researchers Say

When Abrea Ponce, 25, looks back on her childhood, she realizes things could have been different.
The San Diego mother and staff member at the San Diego Regional Task Force on the Homeless spent her critical teen years moving from couch to couch, hotel to hotel to avoid sleeping on the street. The events that led her to become homeless began long before she was a teenager, she believes.