bail: 2 men, one in sweatshirt and jeans, one in suit and tie, stand outside courthouse.

Florida’s Bail System Hasn’t Changed in Jacksonville

Michael Mills had run-ins with the law in his younger, wilder days. Now he is 43, an automotive repairman and father of four who lives in Baldwin, Fla., a quasi-independent municipality in Jacksonville. He thought that was all far behind him until he was arrested in September 2018 on felony charges of impersonating a police officer.

trauma: 3 men talk outside.

Youth Caught in Crosshairs of Cycles of Gun Violence. Is Anybody Listening?

Cassio Batteast, a community advocate in Jackson, recently sat down with 20 of the students in the local school district who were causing the most trouble.
Over weekly meetings, they gradually opened up to him.
“I learned that 10 of the 20 had fathers who had been murdered or fathers who had murdered someone. Half,” he said.

prize: 3 glass plaques with writing on them.

Three Win Leadership Prize From Juvenile Law Center

The Juvenile Law Center awards its Leadership Prize to those who do exceptional work in creating change for youth in the child welfare and justice systems, whether through a large contribution, a lifetime of advocating for change, or any other outstanding efforts.

Man skateboards past billboards about new condos.

Can Washington State Keep Youth Off the Streets After They Leave Detention?

By the age of 17, David Vanwetter had been in and out of detention perhaps a dozen times.
Washington state is vowing to keep young people like Vanwetter — often with complicated and troubled lives — from becoming homeless after they exit the jailhouse door. The state Legislature has ambitiously pledged to stop releasing youth from “publicly funded systems of care” — juvenile detention, foster care and mental health and drug treatment — into homelessness by the end of 2020. And that doesn’t mean putting them in a cab to a homeless shelter: Youth must have “safe and stable housing,” the law says.