Interacting with Kids in the Juvenile Justice System

According to the professionals attending the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative's 25th anniversary celebration in Orlando, Florida, initiating positive, developed relationships with youth in the justice system requires patience, tenacity and understanding.

To Fix the Justice System, Go Outside

For prevention to succeed, those directly affected by violence, as well as those who serve them directly, must be the leaders at the table. Community members are the experts on the structural struggles and needs of their own neighborhoods. We have to ask what they need — and, even more importantly, actually listen to their answers.

Mentorship/Juvenile Justice

"In Caddo Parish, in Shreveport, Louisiana, four out of five kids don't come back [to juvenile court]," said Henry Walker of Caddo Parrish Juvenile Services. "The one of out of five who do come back, come back constantly."
According to Walker, the youth who do avoid regular run-ins with the law do so because they have mentors.
At the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative's April 2017 convening in Orlando, Florida, youth workers reflect on the proactive impact mentors can have on the juveniles in the system.

For Father’s Day From the Inside: Dear Dad …

Throughout the last year I’ve been back and forth between being free and being locked up. I know you weren’t there when I was a child, but you made an effort to be there in my later years.
You proved to me that you’re a good man and changed, now it’s my turn to prove to you that I’m not another juvenile statistic and I can change.

Failure of Public, Political Will Threatens Progress on Child Welfare, Casey warns

Amid the charts and tables of this year’s Kids Count Data Book is a stark warning.

The gains in children’s health, education and overall well-being since the last recession may be in jeopardy as “a huge failure of public and political will” saps support for policies that have helped produce those results, the nonprofit Annie E. Casey Foundation states in its annual compilation of child-welfare statistics.

Bottom Line: Treating Kids Like Kids in Justice System Works Better

What does it mean to be “tough on crime”?

As we moved away from the “crimequake” of the ’90s and watched the juvenile crime rate fall, the fear that once pushed us off the slippery slope and into a lock ’em up frenzy was replaced by evidence-informed policymaking that emphasizes community-based solutions.

Kids Compete, Learn in Juvenile Justice Jeopardy Game

Spending a Saturday morning in a classroom is not something most kids want to do. So why did 110 kids between 9 and 17 years old in Lawrenceville, Georgia, do that in mid-May?

They received basketball instruction from retired NBA stars and learned how to deal with police, tense situations and about Georgia law via Juvenile Justice Jeopardy.

How the U.S. Can and Should Greatly Reduce Mass Probation

As America grapples with its overreliance on incarceration and advocates call for the end of mass incarceration, we must also focus on reducing all criminal justice involvement, including probation.