Henry Montgomery

Inmate From Supreme Court Case Rejected for Parole a Second Time

It’s now been three years since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Henry Montgomery should have a chance to earn parole, because he’d been a teenager at the time of his crime. But on Thursday, the Louisiana parole board voted against parole for Montgomery for the second time. So Montgomery, now 72, will remain in the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, working five days a week at the prison silk-screen shop, as he has for decades. “I’m almost at a loss for words at how it is possible that Henry, yet again, was denied. One would have thought that he would be one of the first,” said Marsha Levick, chief legal officer of the Juvenile Law Center.

Young people hold up signs saying students demand action.

We Students Will Keep Advocating for Background Checks for Gun Sales

In this past year as a student activist for gun safety, I’ve learned that America’s gun problem is a multifaceted issue. Gun violence includes incidents like mass shootings, gang and domestic violence, and suicides.

Diver floats through a hole in net.

Education Permits Growth During Long Prison Sentence and Makes Us Free

Students in the English Literature and Composition Foundations course, offered by the Second Chance Educational Alliance, Inc. in Connecticut, were given the opportunity to draft an opinion piece about the merits of providing higher education opportunities to incarcerated people with lengthy sentences.

From Restorative Justice Skeptic to Advocate in 2 Weeks

Walking back into my middle school classroom after being out the previous day at a training, I first noticed that the colorful plastic chairs were not stacked neatly on desks as they usually are. I could also see some papers scattered on the floor; usually my students are great about following the clean-up routine.

Man skateboards past billboards about new condos.

Can Washington State Keep Youth Off the Streets After They Leave Detention?

By the age of 17, David Vanwetter had been in and out of detention perhaps a dozen times.
Washington state is vowing to keep young people like Vanwetter — often with complicated and troubled lives — from becoming homeless after they exit the jailhouse door. The state Legislature has ambitiously pledged to stop releasing youth from “publicly funded systems of care” — juvenile detention, foster care and mental health and drug treatment — into homelessness by the end of 2020. And that doesn’t mean putting them in a cab to a homeless shelter: Youth must have “safe and stable housing,” the law says.

Homelessness Advocates Tell of New Successes Via State Legislation

Some laws can make life exceptionally difficult for homeless and runaway youth. Whether it’s requiring parental consent to receive health care or demanding proof of residency to obtain a photo ID, unfriendly policies have left many service providers feeling frustrated and powerless to help. A small national nonprofit based in Washington is working to change that.