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Alleged School Bullying Victim, Mom Speak Out On Georgia’s New Bullying Law

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‘It Was Just Pretty Much Assault Every Day’: Alleged School Bullying Victim, Mom Speak Out On Georgia’s New Bullying Law. Back to school season is in full swing and like so many other families around the country 13-year-old Alicyn and her mother Annise Mabry are busy keeping up with the demands of the school year. http://jjie.org/alleged-school-bullying-victim-mom-speak-out-on-georgias-bullying-law/40307/2

However, instead of preparing to go to a local school, Ali takes classes at home. Instead of a classroom, she logs onto her laptop for online lessons. Instead of a teacher, her mom is her instructor.

Georgia Senate to Confront Fallout Over Court Ruling on Charter Schools

Georgia lawmakers who backed an ill-fated effort to skirt local school systems in setting up charter schools now are faced with a daunting task. Last week, the state Supreme Court ruled the setup unconstitutional because it diverted local school money to fund schools overseen by a state commission. Legislators already have promised to press for a constitutional amendment that would work around the high court ruling. But there are too many hoops to pass such an amendment before the 2011-12 academic year begins. So those same lawmakers are now faced with a more pressing challenge: Finding room in other schools for students who were enrolled in the eight existing “commission” charter schools that will now be closed, along with students who were set to attend eight new schools this fall.

Charter School Funding on the Rise Despite Slow Economy

The charter school movement is growing rapidly thanks to an increase in public and private funding.  This despite a struggling economy that has left many states with significant budget shortfalls. Research by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools counted 4,936 charter schools across the country. The number went up 6.7 last year and they expect a 7.5 percent increase for the current school year. As inner-city public schools struggle for funds, public charter schools are receiving millions of dollars in grants from organizations like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Eli and Edyth Broad Foundation, according to Philanthropy News Foundation. The jury is still out on charter school success.  In Indianapolis, one of the lowest-performing school districts in the country, graduation rates were as low as 30 percent.  A strong push for charter schools has increased that rate to around 50 percent.