prevention: angry teen with light brown hair over face, mustard yellow shirt

Prevention, Intervention Better Than Incarceration, Book Says

“Terrence was 16 when he and three other teens attempted to rob a barbeque restaurant in Jacksonville, Florida. Though they left with no money and no one was injured, Terrence was sentenced to die in prison for his involvement in that crime.” —Cara H. Drinan, “The War on Kids”

Solitary confinement: silhouette of single man behind bars holding onto them.

Solitary Confinement, Beloved by Lazy Staff, Simply Doesn’t Work

In 2012, the U.S. Attorney General appointed a national task force on children exposed to violence that concluded, “Nowhere is the impact of incarceration on vulnerable children more obvious than when it involves solitary confinement.” This statement still holds true and solitary confinement bears an even heavier impact on incarcerated youth today.

4 seated, unhappy-looking young people look at woman in jacket and glasses holding a clipboard who faces them. Man on far left in dark hoodie, jeans gestures to her.

Police in Illinois Are Helping Substance Abusers Get Into Rehab Instead of Arresting Them

Ronald Reagan didn’t start the war on drugs but he did his best to finish it. Law enforcement budgets soared, the jails were packed and the war was carried as far afield as Latin America and Afghanistan.

So it might count as one of history’s minor ironies that here in Dixon, just a few blocks from Reagan’s boyhood home, the local police have called a ceasefire in the war on drugs.

concept as a human head brain made of cement being destroyed or renovated by a group of wrecking ball objects with 3D illustration.

Help Crime Victims By Committing to Restorative Justice

From the federal level to state legislatures across the country, criminal justice reform measures are a hot topic of conversation and proposed legislation. What is often lost in those conversations are the views and voices of victims.

Ripe for Juvenile Justice Reform in Arkansas

The number of delinquent youth remanded to the Arkansas Division of Youth Services during the fiscal year that ended in July was the lowest in at least two decades, according to figures recently released by the DYS.