Big Picture Learning Could Help Disrupt the Foster-care-to-prison Pipeline

Humans of Restorative Justice (HORJ) stories highlight the incredible individuals working to build and restore strong relationships in their communities. They are written and edited by David Levine based on interviews with real-world practitioners. This one is with Wilson Platt of Seattle.

Woman seen from back, dressed in black, behind bars, with only hair spotlighted.

Pennsylvanian With Life Sentence Deserves Chance at Facing Victim’s Family, Parole

Several years ago I wrote an opinion column about Marie Scott, a 19-year-old woman sentenced to life without parole in 1973 by the criminal justice system in Philadelphia.
Today, her co-defendant remains in prison waiting for his parole date. Leroy Saxton was 16 years old when he shot their victim to death.

concept as a human head brain made of cement being destroyed or renovated by a group of wrecking ball objects with 3D illustration.

Help Crime Victims By Committing to Restorative Justice

From the federal level to state legislatures across the country, criminal justice reform measures are a hot topic of conversation and proposed legislation. What is often lost in those conversations are the views and voices of victims.

Restorative Justice Helps Us Take Kids Where They Want to Go

Humans of Restorative Justice (HORJ) stories highlight the incredible individuals working to build and restore strong relationships in their communities. They are written and edited by David Levine based on interviews with real-world practitioners. This one is with Keyonn of New York, New York.

School Eating Contest Leaves Bad Taste in Teachers’ Mouths

At the end of a long week of classes, a 10th-grade girl from student government made an announcement in assembly over the buzz of 300 students. When she finished she passed the microphone to another student council member.

Healing, Not Metal Detectors, Will Dismantle the School-to-Prison Pipeline for Good

Schools can be places of healing or they can be places of harm. There is no in-between. I came to learn this through my work as an attorney working at the intersections of youth justice and education equity. I worked in Philadelphia fighting to keep marginalized youth in schools, and to ensure that for the youth who were pushed into juvenile prisons, those prisons were held accountable for providing education.