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A celebratory hug between a Brownsville Youth Court jury member and Youth Justice Coordinator Kellen Felmine after hearing a Project Reset case in the lobby of the Gregory Jackson Center for Brownsville.
A celebratory hug between a Brownsville Youth Court jury member and Youth Justice Coordinator Kellen Felmine after hearing a Project Reset case in the lobby of the Gregory Jackson Center for Brownsville.

Searching for a Solution Where ‘Fear and Weapons Meet’

Sixteen- and 17-year-old first-time offenders with low-level offenses are heard by a court of their peers as part of a new pilot program called Project Reset taking flight in Brownsville, Brooklyn.

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The Handbook of Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

The title and cover of this book immediately sparked my interest, since I had practiced law in the juvenile justice court systems across Georgia as a defense attorney and state prosecutor for almost 20 years.

Addicted to the Street Life

I was born on April 5, 1977 in Harbor City, California. I am 35 and I have been incarcerated since the age of 16. I was tried as an adult and sentenced to 15 years to life for second-degree murder and two attempted murders.

Tamar Birckhead

Attorneys Need to Be Alert to Youth Who May Be Put in Solitary

One important aspect of the discussion of the solitary confinement of youth that has received little attention is the role of race and socioeconomic status. Research has demonstrated that young people of color — like Kalief Browder — are more likely to be placed in the juvenile and adult court systems, to remain in them longer and to experience more punitive sanctions than whites.

Diversion from arrest infographic

How Cities Can Lead in the Effort to Arrest Fewer Youth

Is there ever a “good” youth arrest? Even without the use of excessive force, arrest can prove traumatic and destructive and the effects long lasting. One police leader from a small Pennsylvania town recounted the story of a young person who lost his promising future, with a merit-based scholarship to a four-year college, when police arrested him and charged him with a curfew violation.

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What Is Wrong With the Recovery Movement?

Justin Luke Riley's candid approach to recovery from opioid and other addictions: "I should have a mission every day to make sure that opportunity is provided fairly, equitably to every person who needs it in this country." Riley, 28, is president and CEO of Young People in Recovery, which works to create recovery-ready communities through volunteer chapters and programs in more than 30 states nationwide.